Marketers miss the true power of the Second Screen

Second Screen TV Tablet

 

Increasingly, we’re being told about the ‘power of the second screen’ and how 60% of men, in particular, have their tablet, or smartphone in front of them while consuming TV content. This has given rise to a sea of TV/Network related apps which aim and espouse to give the TV viewer more immersion into what they’re watching. The days of non-interactive television are coming to an end. But what about when the programme isn’t on, does the second screen still play a role when you’ve gone to the kettle after your programme?

 

The answer, according to this post from Google, is an emphatic, yes – especially using their search and YouTube tools, obviously.

 

The report, outlines both YouTube and Google trends around and following TV output, broadly speaking, it shows a year-on-year increase of viewers interacting on YouTube with other fans, and the shows, while on Google, carrying out research into shows, cast, episode information, etc.

 

The data from Google shows, that in the immediate two week period before a show premiere, interest peaks on both channels, with viewers and audiences hungry for information on a show, while current and long running shows generate search and YouTube activity year round (possibly due to syndication when not airing), new shows have peak interest around the premiere, which tails off to a degree following this, until the season end.

 

What the data also shows, is that while people may still be using second screen apps, which are run, usually directly by the network or show – they still go back to Google and YouTube for the more social awareness aspect, and research into shows – basically to see what other people thought of it, what other people expect from a show and whether there will be more episodes.

 

While there’s a lot of information to digest, and not all of it particularly new, what it does do is allow brands who either sponsor a show, or have their products placed in it, to use the suite of Google advertising tools at the right time, for the right audience in an incredibly targeted manner.

 

An example of this might be, Jameson’s Whiskey – Don Draper’s whiskey of choice on AMC’s Mad Men. This show is slightly unusual, in that it displays both characteristics of a new show, and a recurring show on Google – the season hiatus which dragged the show break on while the show was on Netflix gives a good idea of both kinds of above search interaction.

 

Jameson can, with data like this, take the second screen away from the television, where people are already bombarded with ads, and are not giving the tablet their full attention, to the kitchen, where the viewer might go afterwards. Using specific key terms for ads, and SEO they can monopolise in the run up and duration of the show, timing ads to run during the show run, or catch up and repeat times – the growth of DVR and catchup services, unfortunately makes viewing times much more fluid in our On Demand world. Pre-roll ads on YouTube can also take advantage of the status of the drink within Mad Men.

 

Ultimately, as second screen grows alongside on demand viewing and contextual advertising, it’s important to consider that the second screen isn’t just on the sofa, it follows a viewer around their house, while apps are useful for during the show, people will watch YouTube or search Google around the show when they can give it their attention, this is where brands can monopolise on interest, it isn’t always about the flashy app, sometimes digital marketing is about the age old principles of timing, placement and emotional connections – you don’t need to be always on, but you need to make sure people see when you are.

Sony’s Slanty Stab at a Tab

Today I’m having a look at the Sony Tablet S. One of the newest Android tablets on the market, this device really sets itself apart from the competition in so many ways. Let’s look at some of the best and key features on the Sony Tablet.

At first glance, it’s one of the most uniquely designed tablets, with a nice folded and slanting design which creates a much more comfortable usability and browsing experience. The slanted design cleverly hides the huge host of ports, which allow you to connect more devices and share data seamlessly. These include; volume buttons, data ports, SD Card slots, mini USB port, IR Port, headphone jack and power port. This all gives the device a nice seamless look, without distracting you with various buttons and slots from the screen. The screen itself is a gorgeous 9.4″ gloss screen with a 1280-800 resolution.

Sony Tablet S

Smooth, sleek and slanted...

Under the (very) sleek hood, this tablet is packing a lot, with; 1GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, an impressive NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor, gyroscope, DLNA technology and a front and rear facing camera not to mention a solid 8 hours of battery life with standard usage. You really can take everything with you wherever you go. The true black, 9.4″ screen also means that you can browse websites, magazines, newspapers, photos and movies with a crystal clear image in stunning quality.

But it isn’t just the hardware that’s impressive. Running Android’s powerful 3.1 Gingerbread, with the option to upgrade to 3.2, this is not only a well designed tablet, it’s also easy to use for a host of different things to suit whatever you need to do. The user interface is sleek, clear and easy to navigate, offering all of your most important apps right where you need them. There’s already a lot of handy apps natively installed on the tablet, including YouTube, Gmail (with an improved interface) and the Android Marketplace which allows you to download any of the thousands of apps available there such as the Universal Remote Control app, allowing you to take control of any of your home devices. The build-in browser offers a web experience, which is second to none, offering full Flash support so that you can see the web as it’s meant to be seen.

Sony decides to run Android Gingerbread

Sony decides to run Android Gingerbread

Sony Tablet is also Playstation certified, meaning that you can play your favourite titles with ease from the online store. This is probably one of the biggest selling points for the app, and really is the big draw for Sony to play on. The iconic and powerful brand really adds weight to what this tab really is all about and helps attract some of the more serious gamers away from the likes of the iPad, which already has a growing reputation for more and more advanced games.

While the Sony has made a really solid attempt at a tablet, there are a few drawbacks; my big one is the shape. While I genuinely find it actually quite attractive, the teardrop slant means that portrait is very uncomfortable, and I like my tablets (along with a lot of people) in Portrait mode, for magazines and newspapers particularly. The other is the overall interface, coming from iOS to Sony’s Android interface; I found it comparatively messy, lacking the organized simplicity that comes naturally to Apple products.

While I won’t be ditching my iPad anytime soon, as the app environment is still that bit ahead of Android, the Sony Tablet isn’t a bad start. But with Amazon having jumped in the game, Sony really have lost out, and it’s a shame as this really is a nice product.

iPad wi-fi dropping… sometimes…

A few days after the release of the long awaited iPad, many new owners are reporting problems with their gadget’s wi-fi.

Hundreds have reported that their new tablet computer, which has been lauded as the saviour of print media, and a revolution to portable computing, is having big wi-fi problem.

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