Sony’s Slanty Stab at a Tab

Today I’m having a look at the Sony Tablet S. One of the newest Android tablets on the market, this device really sets itself apart from the competition in so many ways. Let’s look at some of the best and key features on the Sony Tablet.

At first glance, it’s one of the most uniquely designed tablets, with a nice folded and slanting design which creates a much more comfortable usability and browsing experience. The slanted design cleverly hides the huge host of ports, which allow you to connect more devices and share data seamlessly. These include; volume buttons, data ports, SD Card slots, mini USB port, IR Port, headphone jack and power port. This all gives the device a nice seamless look, without distracting you with various buttons and slots from the screen. The screen itself is a gorgeous 9.4″ gloss screen with a 1280-800 resolution.

Sony Tablet S

Smooth, sleek and slanted...

Under the (very) sleek hood, this tablet is packing a lot, with; 1GB of RAM, 16GB of storage, an impressive NVIDIA Tegra 2 processor, gyroscope, DLNA technology and a front and rear facing camera not to mention a solid 8 hours of battery life with standard usage. You really can take everything with you wherever you go. The true black, 9.4″ screen also means that you can browse websites, magazines, newspapers, photos and movies with a crystal clear image in stunning quality.

But it isn’t just the hardware that’s impressive. Running Android’s powerful 3.1 Gingerbread, with the option to upgrade to 3.2, this is not only a well designed tablet, it’s also easy to use for a host of different things to suit whatever you need to do. The user interface is sleek, clear and easy to navigate, offering all of your most important apps right where you need them. There’s already a lot of handy apps natively installed on the tablet, including YouTube, Gmail (with an improved interface) and the Android Marketplace which allows you to download any of the thousands of apps available there such as the Universal Remote Control app, allowing you to take control of any of your home devices. The build-in browser offers a web experience, which is second to none, offering full Flash support so that you can see the web as it’s meant to be seen.

Sony decides to run Android Gingerbread

Sony decides to run Android Gingerbread

Sony Tablet is also Playstation certified, meaning that you can play your favourite titles with ease from the online store. This is probably one of the biggest selling points for the app, and really is the big draw for Sony to play on. The iconic and powerful brand really adds weight to what this tab really is all about and helps attract some of the more serious gamers away from the likes of the iPad, which already has a growing reputation for more and more advanced games.

While the Sony has made a really solid attempt at a tablet, there are a few drawbacks; my big one is the shape. While I genuinely find it actually quite attractive, the teardrop slant means that portrait is very uncomfortable, and I like my tablets (along with a lot of people) in Portrait mode, for magazines and newspapers particularly. The other is the overall interface, coming from iOS to Sony’s Android interface; I found it comparatively messy, lacking the organized simplicity that comes naturally to Apple products.

While I won’t be ditching my iPad anytime soon, as the app environment is still that bit ahead of Android, the Sony Tablet isn’t a bad start. But with Amazon having jumped in the game, Sony really have lost out, and it’s a shame as this really is a nice product.

A book for every worm, combined with a gadget for every nerd

Since the first Kindle was brought out, e-readers have flooded the market, turning what was the reserve of the highly tech-savvy nerds who were going around with clunky PDA’s into something for the mainstream user, an electronic method of reading that appealed to everyone using some basic principles; strong battery life, competitive pricing and most of all convenience; the availability of ebooks which was stifling to the original models along with their technological constraints.

As readers of this blog will know, I own a Sony PRS-505. It’s a fantastic device, lightweight, comfortable to hold, good screen and it feels good and solid in your hand. There are some drawbacks, the basic memory isn’t strong (thought this can be fixed with the various SD cards on the market) it’s buttons are slightly all over the place which can be annoying and it has a general lack of connectivity; it just doesn’t like to play nice with other devices.

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Kindle Gets Social with Twitter and Facebook…

It was announced this week that with a new firmware update being brought out for Kindle, Amazon’s popular e-reader, a more social aspect would be introduced in the form of Facebook and Twitter integration.

The move comes as iPad sales continue to rise and challenge Amazon’s dominance in the e-reading market of which it currently has the lion’s share.

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iPhone becomes truly wireless and start digging for floppy’s

A new way to sync our iPhones and iPads might be on the way soon enough, doing away with those USB cables, which can be a bit of a nuisance at times when looking for a quick sync.

A bright spark of a developer has come up with a new App called Wi-Fi Sync, which enables users to wirelessly sync their iPhones, iPads and iPod touches to their computer using their home wireless networks.

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iPhones in bars and TV’s go 3D…

It’s been an eventful week for technology world; We’ve seen Facebook ‘like’ the internet, secret space planes being launched, HP give more details on its Slate and least of all there’s some serious sacking going on in Apple all over a bar, $5,000, photos and some German beer.

Unless you’ve been on holidays on Mars for the past few days, and the roaming costs a fortune, then you’ll know that the iPhone 4G has been the centre of the biggest leak of the year. Gray Powell, a now infamous name in Cupertino and (former) Apple employee left the next iPhone in a bar, only to be picked up by someone who later sold the handset on to the popular tech website, Gizmodo.

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Kindle 2.0, are we finally to get a new browsing experience?

Amazon may be preparing to launch  a new browser for it’s Kindle e-reader range it has been suggested.

A job posting has recently been spotted for a browser engineer at a division of Amazon set aside specifically for the development of software for the Kindle, known as Lab126.

The company appears to be looking to recruit someone who can design new features for the popular reader’s notably sub-standard browser interface, and does require knowledge of current web standards, web rendering engines, Java and embedded Linux.

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An Apple a day, keeps the competition away…

Apple has changed the world, literally. They’ve let us bring our music libraries with us where ever we go, made smart phones cool for the average joe blogs, now they’re going to shake up up portables and how we read news and magazines.

While this is brilliant for us, who are now so used to seeing the Apple logo, it’s practically one of our five-a-day now. The Software and hardware giant has also livened up competition, made other companies fight for our attention and forcing them to produce machines that don’t just work, but look attractive.

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