OnePlus, Inviting Social Success

OnePlus Two

The smartphone industry is easily one of the most competitive in the modern market, if not, the most. Apple and Samsung continue to dominate with huge marketing budgets and ever increasing customer loyalty. Factor in concepts like Apple’s leasing programme and it’s now more difficult than ever for the little guy to make it. The most public examples are HTC, who have now stopped posting financial projections, and BlackBerry, a platform with a smaller user-base than Samsung Tizen.

One small manufacturer looking to shift this paradigm and carve out its place in the marketplace, is OnePlus, a Chinese manufacturer based on a team from Oppo. OnePlus have taken the approach of low-price, high feature, aiming at the savvy mid-range consumer.With almost no budget, they have deployed guerrilla tactics to grow a fanbase of early adopters and savvy consumers, not unlike Apple in the buzz they generate, even if at a smaller scale.

OnePlus clearly understand that going toe-to-toe with Apple and Samsung in a marketing war is futile, as many have tried and failed to reach the mass market (HTC for example, whose ads seem content to bounce between weird and bizarre). So OnePlus haven’t bothered. Through social media and an approach to sales which defies standard practice, OnePlus have managed to make headlines across the web. Coupled with a buying system that favours a select percentage, the short supply and high demand has gotten people talking with their famous ‘Invite-only’ approach.

What’s most interesting about OnePlus’s social media campaigns is that they’re entirely organic and driven towards invites; relying on user-generated content and stirring up demand to drive awareness among like-minded people. Example social campaigns have gone from destroying your own phone on YouTube in order to obtain a OnePlusOne invite, to their current campaign of a reflective Instagram-selfie for the OnePlusX.

OnePlus have a huge benefit to play with: they’re brand new. Less than two years old, they’re a company which can afford to take a few calculated risks. With no marketing budget, and no real profit for a company still in it’s early stages, their approach is much more engaging, much more fun and has a specific focus; get people to want an invite.

The biggest challenge for OnePlus, is that it might not be a drop in the ocean forever. Currently, they’re doing all the right things. Their stall at the Dublin Web Summit had people lining up for invites, even though they weren’t quite sure what exactly the phone was, or who OnePlus were. The invite-only list added to the intrigue and people started sharing their OnePlus selfies. It’s a clever strategy to generate awareness, and it’s paying off.

Unfortunately, when you’re no longer a drop in the ocean, Samsung and Apple begin to pay attention, shareholders begin to look for profit (which currently OnePlus reinvests into its devices) and you need to change your marketing approach. Mass market devices can’t be sold via invite-only and online shopping for smartphones is still relatively uncommon globally.

OnePlus is beginning to think about this and how they can keep up newsworthy and engaging campaigns, which create ‘Fear of Missing out’. There are signs of a shift, albeit a slow one. OnePlus is now opening its online store for general sale for one hour per week. It might not sound like much, but it’s a step towards mass purchase that the company needs to consider.

The strategy behind their approach towards moving into the mainstream is fairly clear; as the company grows, all content should encourage invites and create exclusivity. All the while, they can perfect their next generation of phones, which move closer to the real mid-range of the mass handset market. At what point the strategy moves from upstart to traditional will be the real test for OnePlus.

HTC One M8 – REVIEW

HTC One m8

The HTC One M8 is the latest attempt by the flailing smartphone manufacturer to shore up some of its recent losses in the face of growing competition from the likes of LG, Apple and particularly, Samsung – who have managed to vacuum up almost all of the former giant’s lead. Last year’s HTC One (M7) was considered a somewhat iconic design, and was the company’s best selling handset, ever. However, it didn’t buck the downwards trend that the company faces. The One M8 it is hoped will change all of that.

 

Released in Ireland, and the world earlier this week, the M8 is available on all major networks. The Dot View Case has not been released yet, however some sites now offer this on pre-order in five different colours.

 

But just what is the M8 like?

 

The Box

An unboxing video is to follow, however – the box itself is pretty neat – larger than it really needs to be, but clearly taking a more Apple oriented direction – very slim, and very simple. With the phone, comes a basic rubber case, headphones, charger cable and standard plug.

 

The Hardware

When you first pick up, what looks like the rather sizeable phone, what strikes immediately is just how well built the device really is. The back is gently curved, not enough to offer much rocking, but it fits comfortably into the hand. The single aluminum slab feels great, the machine-drilled speakers blend in well. The device front looks a little more cluttered when you come from a Nexus device, which is blank on the front. It’s a little heavy, but not in an uncomfortable way, it feels weighty in a very solid sense.

 

The only irk I would have when it comes to build quality, would be the volume rocker – it’s a little flimsy by comparison and could be a bit more solid, same goes for the power button – but thanks to gesture controls, it rarely gets used.

 

The camera blends in nicely – it looks a little odd to have two lenses at the back, but it’s integrated well overall. Speaking of the camera, a lot of people (including myself) have been worried about the 4 ‘Ultrapixel’ argument – thankfully, I was pleasantly surprised, the camera is, in my opinion, better than the Nexus 4.

 

The screen to show off these pictures is gorgeous, it blends in with the overall device, you’d never even realize it was there – when switched on, it’s very sharp, text is crisp and pictures look just stunning – the extra real estate really helps.

 

Topping and Tailing the screen, is a pair of fairly gorgeous speakers. They’re loud, really loud and clear. Some music came across as a bit tinny, but overall the speakers were clear, sharp and a song being played in the living room, I could clearly hear in the next room.

 

Coming from the Nexus, a range which has been plagued by poor batter life, the M8 is simply amazing in terms of battery. It lasts well over a day on moderate – heavy usage, with the screen brightness up and the 3G/WiFi on. It charges nice and quickly, certainly tasks that would drop the Nexus 4 by 10%, only really use up 5% or less from the M8.

 

The Software

Turning on the phone, I was very worried. Previously using Sense had been somewhat of a disappointment especially when coming from stock. However I have to say, Sense 6 is slick. The gestures, such as lifting the phone to your ear to answer a call, are genuinely useful, rather than Samsung’s bloatware which gets ignored. Sense is definitely a nice overlay to the Android OS, It’s a lot more background and simple, making sure that it doesn’t intrude too much on how you interact with the phone.

 

Some things I really like coming from stock, is the greater flexibility of the notifications centre, there’s a lot more functionality when double swiping, the ability to easily drop widgets into any section or homescreen is quite nice. Blinkfeed is really quite nice also. Flipboard like functionality and easily accessible, it’s a nice feature to read while you’re waiting on something, aggregating items from several of your news sources.

 

The Camera

I wasn’t convinced by the ‘Ultrapixel’ argument at first, it seemed like quite an easy cop-out to have an amazing phone, with one major Achilles heel. However, having used it and taken quite a few snaps, the quality is actually pretty good. The screen doesn’t hide much, but images are sharp and crisp, certainly more than enough for social sharing and Instagram.

Filtered shot from the camera

The camera also features some pretty handy things, Zoe is a little bit of a gimmick, but it’s a nice touch to allow the creation of your own Vine like GIF, the ability to refocus an image after shooting is very nice, and it’s something I have been using a lot in pictures, especially if the object I want to capture isn’t the centre.

 

While the features are nice, I liked that Nexus allows you to browse your auto-backup images within the gallery by default.

 

Images though are really, lovely – the gesture of holding your locked phone in landscape and hitting the volume button is really a nice touch to snap a quick shot on the go.

 

Wrap up

Overall, I’m hugely impressed with the M8. The handset itself I would say almost surpasses the iPhone in design, it slips into the hand neatly, rather than a block working against it. The gestures and overall intuition are top notch, the camera is more than decent and the speakers are pretty powerful. While I do think I still prefer stock, just about – the HTC One M8 pretty much trumps it.

 

After having it for about four days, I wouldn’t even hesitate in giving this phone a 10/10.

5 Things the Samsung S5 should have

With the release of the new iPhone 5S and 5C, all eyes have turned to Apple’s new arch-rival, Samsung to see exactly what they’ll pull out of the bag for their new flagship phone, the S5. Just as the headlines of Apple’s huge success in shifting their latest smartphone begin to ebb, reports have surfaced that the S5 will debut in January.

Continue reading

[OPINION] Why Google have started the Real Tablet War

Since the launch of the iPad, about three years ago now, competition has been springing up from every corner. Sony lunched their tablets which, while elegant were certainly the more unusual in the design spectrum. Samsung also threw a half dozen tablets into the market, with names no one can really remember and no discernible strategy of formula (The Note seems unsure whether it’s a phone, or a tablet). Amazon was the first real competition to the market, with the Fire. A low price point helped it clean up the Android tablet market. But, enter Google and everything changes.

Continue reading

[FEATURE] Top Smartphones of the Mobile World Congress

The Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona is perhaps the biggest tech gathering of the year, with virtually every tech company and mobile network present for companies to unveil their plans for upcoming smartphones, and to generally show off what they can produce to the world.

Mobile world congress entrance

Entrance to the Mobile World Congress

Continue reading

Putting the Apple in TV

Apple this week have launched an attempt to transform yet another market, which some see as becoming stale and outdated; television. No doubt many were disappointed that no iphone or iPad updates were released apart from iOS4.2 as rumours had predicted for the Christmas market. However, the extremely exciting announcement of the new Apple TV picks up where it’s predecessor model left off (generally considered to be a flop, and just one of Jobs own pet projects) in beginning to make television much more networked an experience.

Continue reading

iPhone in the lead in Ireland’s smartphone market.

It’s official; the iPhone is Ireland’s most popular smart phone, beating the competition by a clear lead.

This week, DRG, a digital advertising agency announced that iPhone sales in Ireland had reached 250,000 handsets over the various models, and that iPhone internet browsers account for an increasing amount of web traffic in a recently released bunch of statistics for the Irish mobile market, one of the highest penetrated markets in the world (about two phones for every person in the country).

Continue reading